Jan 072014
 

Woman's Eye and World GlobesPart One of this post was posted by Mary Osborne on  Dec. 17.

We can assume if they are in a dental office that they have some value for health.  Deeper questions flow from that assumption: What important aspects of this person’s life will be affected in a positive way by having good oral health? What aspirations do they have that would be negatively impacted if they avoid doing dentistry? Exploring those issues can help them clarify what our dentistry will help them achieve that is personally relevant to them.I don’t think of understanding patients’ values as some obscure, esoteric concept. I think of practical issues, such as what they like to eat, and how they like to spend their time. Questions that come up for me are: What has motivated them to choose healthy foods, or exercise, or make any significant change in their lives? Who influences their choices and why? What are their hopes and their fears? What is valuable enough to them to cause them to move beyond financial concerns, discomfort, inconvenience, or other perceived barriers? What must we include in our conversation to allow them to trust that we have their best interest at heart? Continue reading »

LinkedInEmailShare/Bookmark
Dec 172013
 

questionsBy Mary Osborne

In dentistry we know the answer to why patients SHOULD do what we recommend. We frequently ask ourselves why they WON’T do the treatment we suggest. But the question I think we should be paying more attention to is, “Why WOULD they do it?” I wrote recently about moving our conversations with patients away from insurance benefits, and into conversations about the benefits of health. I offered a formula which outlines the elements necessary for health; the health of your patients and the health of your practice.

CSJ + PO + FF + MOP = Health
Care, Skill and Judgment + Preferred Outcomes + a Fair Fee + the Method of Payment = Health Continue reading »

Oct 082013
 

anxiousIt’s common knowledge that most patients do not look forward to dental work. On the other hand, it is a small number of patients who have significant fear or anxiety about dental care, the kind that prevents them from getting the procedures they need and want. So for this small group of people what systems do you have in place. The traditional things we do to help patients be comfortable are not going to make enough of an impact for people who are truly apprehensive about dentistry. Continue reading »

Jul 152013
 

By Mary Osborne RDH

reachingI wrote recently about moving our conversations with patients away from insurance benefits, and into conversations about the benefits of health. While we cannot ignore the role insurance may play in the choices patients make, I’m concerned that we sometimes lose sight of other factors which contribute to the process of making healthy choices. While we have no control over the future of dental insurance, we can influence all the other aspects of the equation.

CSJ + PO + FF + MOP = Health

Care, Skill and Judgment + Preferred Outcomes + a Fair Fee + the Method of Payment = Health

Today I will speak to the first part of the equation: Care, Skill, and Judgment. This refers to what we bring to the process, and this factor alone is completely within our control. Each practice has its own brand of Patient Care, and it varies from one practice to another. Y Continue reading »

May 142013
 

communicationThanks Mary Osborne for the following post!!

I’m tired of talking about insurance benefits. So much is being said today about “changes in health care,” but the conversation really tends to be more about changes in insurance benefits. I think the time is right for those of us in dentistry to lead the way into a different conversation; a conversation about health.
We have a lot to learn about health; a lot to explore with our patients. Beyond education there is a place for authentic dialogue; an exchange of ideas in which there is learning on both sides. Beyond a mechanistic model of health is a true understanding of vitality, of what it means to thrive. Continue reading »